A Review of 'Greeting Card' by Toys R Us Deli Counter

by Maciej Lewicki

A Review of 'Greeting Card' by Toys R Us Deli Counter

Greeting Card, the debut EP from toys ‘r’ us deli counter is, admittedly, rough around the edges. Still, there is a devious glimmer that shows itself through this self-recorded maladroit and makes it known that this isn’t just another half-assed lo-fi recording. The songs are all very memorable, to the point that I found many of the lyrics stuck in my head after just a few listens, and the humble instrumentation is more than enough to create a ghastly instrumentations. The electronic drums and chorusy guitar that introduce lugia set the stage for the vocals to come in, reminiscent of a toned-down Dexter Holland on the Offspring’s self-titled record. The lines stuck here without you/on route 32 burn themselves into your head by the time the electronic drums cue in old bones, a banjo-driven punk song that even more aptly draws itself into the Offspring comparison. The vocal melody and the way the lyrics flow into each other brings to mind songs like Crossroads and Tehran, while the banjo in the background adds a country flair to establish the song as its own entity. These vibes continue with return to dreamland, with the chorusy guitar and electronic elements coming back and creating a sort of apex to match old bones. Finally, venus hits with what is the most haunting and memorable chorus on the EP. A bright electric guitar backscores the lines i know you fear the/passing of time/and what happens when we’re no longer/intertwined in a stunning closure to the album. Overall, while not perfect, Greeting Card creates a unique sound for toys ‘r’ us deli counter and hints for a bright future.

A Review of 'Greeting Card' by Toys R Us Deli Counter

by Maciej Lewicki

A Review of 'Greeting Card' by Toys R Us Deli Counter

Greeting Card, the debut EP from toys ‘r’ us deli counter is, admittedly, rough around the edges. Still, there is a devious glimmer that shows itself through this self-recorded maladroit and makes it known that this isn’t just another half-assed lo-fi recording. The songs are all very memorable, to the point that I found many of the lyrics stuck in my head after just a few listens, and the humble instrumentation is more than enough to create a ghastly instrumentations. The electronic drums and chorusy guitar that introduce lugia set the stage for the vocals to come in, reminiscent of a toned-down Dexter Holland on the Offspring’s self-titled record. The lines stuck here without you/on route 32 burn themselves into your head by the time the electronic drums cue in old bones, a banjo-driven punk song that even more aptly draws itself into the Offspring comparison. The vocal melody and the way the lyrics flow into each other brings to mind songs like Crossroads and Tehran, while the banjo in the background adds a country flair to establish the song as its own entity. These vibes continue with return to dreamland, with the chorusy guitar and electronic elements coming back and creating a sort of apex to match old bones. Finally, venus hits with what is the most haunting and memorable chorus on the EP. A bright electric guitar backscores the lines i know you fear the/passing of time/and what happens when we’re no longer/intertwined in a stunning closure to the album. Overall, while not perfect, Greeting Card creates a unique sound for toys ‘r’ us deli counter and hints for a bright future.