A Review of 'Thunder and Yearning'

by Maciej Lewicki

A Review of 'Thunder and Yearning'

GorpoPap’s latest album, Thunder & Yearning, feels most at home in the dark winter afternoons. The synths throughout are like the ever-present cold breeze hitting you over and over until you get used to it. That’s not to say the cold is all there is to the album – it starts warmly with Miss U, and the image of seniors dancing in the park stays there, making a journey of its slow decay until finally being replaced by Vera ushering in the cold with the words but who can I call/when it’s late at night/and I’m on my last straw? That’s when the feeling of loss hits you and this pattern continues into the next song, My Eyes/Sweet Baby. With an arrangement reminiscent of new wave and Vera’s voice a mix of Morrissey’s crooning and nondescript midwest emo singer, it all falls into place – a longing for the past that is all but amplified by the lyrics and the drawn out vocals presenting them. As the album hits Lost City, you feel disoriented as though you were there. The spacey vocals and consistent beat put together a soundscape that is everywhere and nowhere at once, the park is brought up again, now a long and distant memory. As the album hits a midpoint, with the songs Feminine Performance and 02/09/2019, Vera explores this disorienting landscape, haunted by the past, feelings of shame, and attempts to find their own identity. The album hits its climax with the second half of 02/09/2019, with a moving electronic arrangement underscoring Vera’s frightening screams as they recount a painful experience, ending with I don’t care/he’s not here/it’s fine/I’m fine repeated over an over. In contrast, the ending of the album feels like heaven, with both Gay Lovers Moving Slowly in the Dark and Beautiful Faggots feeling like a counterpoint to the rest of the album. As the synths come in with the words so kiss me/touch me slowly, Vera’s high vocals bring about chills and everything falls into place - they have found their way out of the lost city.

A Review of 'Thunder and Yearning'

by Maciej Lewicki

A Review of 'Thunder and Yearning'

GorpoPap’s latest album, Thunder & Yearning, feels most at home in the dark winter afternoons. The synths throughout are like the ever-present cold breeze hitting you over and over until you get used to it. That’s not to say the cold is all there is to the album – it starts warmly with Miss U, and the image of seniors dancing in the park stays there, making a journey of its slow decay until finally being replaced by Vera ushering in the cold with the words but who can I call/when it’s late at night/and I’m on my last straw? That’s when the feeling of loss hits you and this pattern continues into the next song, My Eyes/Sweet Baby. With an arrangement reminiscent of new wave and Vera’s voice a mix of Morrissey’s crooning and nondescript midwest emo singer, it all falls into place – a longing for the past that is all but amplified by the lyrics and the drawn out vocals presenting them. As the album hits Lost City, you feel disoriented as though you were there. The spacey vocals and consistent beat put together a soundscape that is everywhere and nowhere at once, the park is brought up again, now a long and distant memory. As the album hits a midpoint, with the songs Feminine Performance and 02/09/2019, Vera explores this disorienting landscape, haunted by the past, feelings of shame, and attempts to find their own identity. The album hits its climax with the second half of 02/09/2019, with a moving electronic arrangement underscoring Vera’s frightening screams as they recount a painful experience, ending with I don’t care/he’s not here/it’s fine/I’m fine repeated over an over. In contrast, the ending of the album feels like heaven, with both Gay Lovers Moving Slowly in the Dark and Beautiful Faggots feeling like a counterpoint to the rest of the album. As the synths come in with the words so kiss me/touch me slowly, Vera’s high vocals bring about chills and everything falls into place - they have found their way out of the lost city.