The Scrambled Eggs Release 'Do You Believe in Gravity?'

by Alex Tripodi

The Scrambled Eggs Release 'Do You Believe in Gravity?'

From parts unknown in the Dirty Jerz comes Do You Believe In Gravity?, a surrealist serving of songs from the elusively-credited D. Lamb, a person who I can only assume has spent a lot of time in their home since well before the pandemic made hermit madhats of us all. While I obviously can’t speak for sure on their listening habits, the stylistic leanings echo forth from the earliest of “indie” bands - the tongue-in-cheek strut of The Cleaners From Venus, the gleefully absurd synth-rocking of The Deep Freeze Mice, and a touch of Daniel Johnston’s lonerist charm. There is a casual psychedelic sensibility that peaks out all over this EP, and whoever D. Lamb is, I imagine they have a big, warm, acid-washed grin as they twiddle out vintage bass and guitar licks for days.


The immediate propulsion of the first song, “Do You Believe In Gravity?”, conjures post-punky loner-rock sounds of early Deerhunter. The song dips into a slowed-down bridge that lulls you into static serenity. “My Shoes Are Wet” is a superb whisper-shuffle that reminds me of many a nighttime walk home. The consistent, disorienting guitar serves to elevate this feeling, as anyone who’s taken part in such dusky strolls knows a certain nervous drive that undergirds the experience. It certainly doesn’t hurt that the riff is a certified ear worm, and the unmelodic-guitar-run-as-solo is especially kindred to the spiraling thoughts one might have about the Law & Order episode they might end up as. “Elevator Song” keeps the foot-tapping consistency going with a rock-solid bass line that vaguely reminds me of Delta 5, acting as canvas on which the rest of the song is painted, all the way up to this tasty zen-is-when type slide that delivers our ears into a spacey, tasty noise bridge worthy of Tomorrow’s legendary, trance-inducing “My White Bicycle”.

At this point I would like to point out how interesting the lyrics are: D. Lamb has turned the taps on their brain-faucet and let it spill freely. Some might see this as frivolity; I happen to enjoy the opportunity we are afforded to look at mundane reality in imaginative new ways. While this is an evident hallmark of all the songs on Do You Believe In Gravity? (in fact, even that title should prepare you to question the moors of our reality that you may be taking for granted), my favorite examples come packed into what at first seems like the most demure track of the clutch. “What The Heck” is maybe the… hardest?… this release gets. I won’t harp much on this, but what I’m talking about is summed up perfectly in the first lines: “Flies on the face of rotting corpse etiquette/ Mint-flavored mace and billy club gowns/We have the reason to under-appreciate, over-exfoliate, over-pontificate”.

In that last line, and the earlier “Human person with your head full of rocks” in “Elevator Song”, D. Lamb comes off as someone who finds comfort in keeping it real about our cosmic insignificance. It’s got a certain endearing quality to it that can perhaps only come from the acceptance of people as they come, frills abound. And the closing track, “That’s The Way It Works”, carries a whimsical wisdom to not taking things so damn seriously: “Isn’t it nice?/When bubbles don’t burst/because no one’s proclaiming/‘That’s the way it works’”. Like, politely, how dare anyone be so certain about the world as they perceive it? Personally, this is exactly the spirit I needed to be met with at this particularly uncertain global moment, and for this EP I’m unexpectedly very thankful.

The Scrambled Eggs Release 'Do You Believe in Gravity?'

by Alex Tripodi

The Scrambled Eggs Release 'Do You Believe in Gravity?'

From parts unknown in the Dirty Jerz comes Do You Believe In Gravity?, a surrealist serving of songs from the elusively-credited D. Lamb, a person who I can only assume has spent a lot of time in their home since well before the pandemic made hermit madhats of us all. While I obviously can’t speak for sure on their listening habits, the stylistic leanings echo forth from the earliest of “indie” bands - the tongue-in-cheek strut of The Cleaners From Venus, the gleefully absurd synth-rocking of The Deep Freeze Mice, and a touch of Daniel Johnston’s lonerist charm. There is a casual psychedelic sensibility that peaks out all over this EP, and whoever D. Lamb is, I imagine they have a big, warm, acid-washed grin as they twiddle out vintage bass and guitar licks for days.


The immediate propulsion of the first song, “Do You Believe In Gravity?”, conjures post-punky loner-rock sounds of early Deerhunter. The song dips into a slowed-down bridge that lulls you into static serenity. “My Shoes Are Wet” is a superb whisper-shuffle that reminds me of many a nighttime walk home. The consistent, disorienting guitar serves to elevate this feeling, as anyone who’s taken part in such dusky strolls knows a certain nervous drive that undergirds the experience. It certainly doesn’t hurt that the riff is a certified ear worm, and the unmelodic-guitar-run-as-solo is especially kindred to the spiraling thoughts one might have about the Law & Order episode they might end up as. “Elevator Song” keeps the foot-tapping consistency going with a rock-solid bass line that vaguely reminds me of Delta 5, acting as canvas on which the rest of the song is painted, all the way up to this tasty zen-is-when type slide that delivers our ears into a spacey, tasty noise bridge worthy of Tomorrow’s legendary, trance-inducing “My White Bicycle”.

At this point I would like to point out how interesting the lyrics are: D. Lamb has turned the taps on their brain-faucet and let it spill freely. Some might see this as frivolity; I happen to enjoy the opportunity we are afforded to look at mundane reality in imaginative new ways. While this is an evident hallmark of all the songs on Do You Believe In Gravity? (in fact, even that title should prepare you to question the moors of our reality that you may be taking for granted), my favorite examples come packed into what at first seems like the most demure track of the clutch. “What The Heck” is maybe the… hardest?… this release gets. I won’t harp much on this, but what I’m talking about is summed up perfectly in the first lines: “Flies on the face of rotting corpse etiquette/ Mint-flavored mace and billy club gowns/We have the reason to under-appreciate, over-exfoliate, over-pontificate”.

In that last line, and the earlier “Human person with your head full of rocks” in “Elevator Song”, D. Lamb comes off as someone who finds comfort in keeping it real about our cosmic insignificance. It’s got a certain endearing quality to it that can perhaps only come from the acceptance of people as they come, frills abound. And the closing track, “That’s The Way It Works”, carries a whimsical wisdom to not taking things so damn seriously: “Isn’t it nice?/When bubbles don’t burst/because no one’s proclaiming/‘That’s the way it works’”. Like, politely, how dare anyone be so certain about the world as they perceive it? Personally, this is exactly the spirit I needed to be met with at this particularly uncertain global moment, and for this EP I’m unexpectedly very thankful.