An Interview with Greg Mendez: One Year out from the Release of Cherry Hell

by Beck Macey

An Interview with Greg Mendez: One Year out from the Release of Cherry Hell

Beck: What influences did you pull on when writing Cherry Hell? Are there specific themes that you drew on? As well as any artists you might have pulled influence from too?

Greg: I guess the songs are like photographs but not as exact, so more like drawings or paintings of things from my past or from people who are close to me, especially for this album, but really all of my music as well. But really, it’s kind of a way to process things even though it’s not quite so intentional. So the moral of the story is, there isn’t really a theme for this album but rather a collection of truths.

Beck: Now that you’re a year out from the album do you view it differently or have different emotions when processing the album?

Greg: Interestingly enough I don’t hate it. Which is weird because usually immediately after I release something, I find myself saying I never want to listen to this again. However, I had that period with it where I didn’t revisit it for a really long time, but I was proud of it the whole time, so that was a really nice change. Now, I have revisited it a few times throughout the year, and certain songs hit me a little more. Things that I thought I didn’t like about it; I now like which is such a nice feeling because I usually listen to things I made before and am just cringing the entire time.

Beck: Do you have a different favorite track now then you had a year ago?

Greg: Now, the first song, freak, is one of my favorites, and I was actually gonna cut that song originally because I just thought it wasn’t very good. However, a couple people I’m close with were like “this is maybe the best one on there” so I was like “okay I’m gonna throw it somewhere in the middle so it’ll get glossed over” and then we couldn’t think of any other opener so I asked my friend Ian who was helping me mix the record and I said, “What would be the most unexpected one to open the record with?” and we both said freak and it ended up just working really well there. Which now makes me appreciate it a lot more.

Beck: When releasing Cherry Hell were there any people you collaborated with? Or are there people you want to collaborate with in the future.

Greg: There’s a bunch of people who had their hands in it! Veronica Isley, who also fronts a band I drum in called Snowhore, sang a bunch of harmonies on the record and played guitar in one of the interludes. I also recorded the drums with Evan Bernard at Big Mama’s Recording because I’m really bad at micing up drums, but he made them sound really good. I mixed with Ian Farmer at the Metal Shop and then Ryan Schwabe mastered it, so they were all instrumental to the album. It wouldn’t be what it is without all their help. In the future I want to ask Shannen Moser to sing on some stuff and we talked about me singing on one of her songs too, so I think that would be really cool.

Beck: Is there anything you want listeners to specifically take away from this album?

Greg: I just really hope they like it, and I hope that people can find some vision in it that makes sense to them. Making music helps me get through things and the coolest thing I think would be if my music helped someone get through things as well.

Beck: So, in the future what are some things coming down the pipe?

Greg: Definitely within the next two years, there’s a couple of splits that I’m working on and maybe a single or two. But probably the next full length by 2022.

An Interview with Greg Mendez: One Year out from the Release of Cherry Hell

by Beck Macey

An Interview with Greg Mendez: One Year out from the Release of Cherry Hell

Beck: What influences did you pull on when writing Cherry Hell? Are there specific themes that you drew on? As well as any artists you might have pulled influence from too?

Greg: I guess the songs are like photographs but not as exact, so more like drawings or paintings of things from my past or from people who are close to me, especially for this album, but really all of my music as well. But really, it’s kind of a way to process things even though it’s not quite so intentional. So the moral of the story is, there isn’t really a theme for this album but rather a collection of truths.

Beck: Now that you’re a year out from the album do you view it differently or have different emotions when processing the album?

Greg: Interestingly enough I don’t hate it. Which is weird because usually immediately after I release something, I find myself saying I never want to listen to this again. However, I had that period with it where I didn’t revisit it for a really long time, but I was proud of it the whole time, so that was a really nice change. Now, I have revisited it a few times throughout the year, and certain songs hit me a little more. Things that I thought I didn’t like about it; I now like which is such a nice feeling because I usually listen to things I made before and am just cringing the entire time.

Beck: Do you have a different favorite track now then you had a year ago?

Greg: Now, the first song, freak, is one of my favorites, and I was actually gonna cut that song originally because I just thought it wasn’t very good. However, a couple people I’m close with were like “this is maybe the best one on there” so I was like “okay I’m gonna throw it somewhere in the middle so it’ll get glossed over” and then we couldn’t think of any other opener so I asked my friend Ian who was helping me mix the record and I said, “What would be the most unexpected one to open the record with?” and we both said freak and it ended up just working really well there. Which now makes me appreciate it a lot more.

Beck: When releasing Cherry Hell were there any people you collaborated with? Or are there people you want to collaborate with in the future.

Greg: There’s a bunch of people who had their hands in it! Veronica Isley, who also fronts a band I drum in called Snowhore, sang a bunch of harmonies on the record and played guitar in one of the interludes. I also recorded the drums with Evan Bernard at Big Mama’s Recording because I’m really bad at micing up drums, but he made them sound really good. I mixed with Ian Farmer at the Metal Shop and then Ryan Schwabe mastered it, so they were all instrumental to the album. It wouldn’t be what it is without all their help. In the future I want to ask Shannen Moser to sing on some stuff and we talked about me singing on one of her songs too, so I think that would be really cool.

Beck: Is there anything you want listeners to specifically take away from this album?

Greg: I just really hope they like it, and I hope that people can find some vision in it that makes sense to them. Making music helps me get through things and the coolest thing I think would be if my music helped someone get through things as well.

Beck: So, in the future what are some things coming down the pipe?

Greg: Definitely within the next two years, there’s a couple of splits that I’m working on and maybe a single or two. But probably the next full length by 2022.