Another Hospital Releases the Highly Anticipated EP ‘Proof Of Context’

by Maciej Lewicki

Another Hospital Releases the Highly Anticipated EP ‘Proof Of Context’

Proof of Context, the newest EP from Philadelphia’s Another Hospital feels like an acid trip. From the light acoustic guitar and spacey vocals on the intro to Try It Sometime, front person Eric Kohlenstein sets the stage for the rest of the album – the self-described ‘feeling of being stuck in a loop’ hits from the very start as lines and endings are repeated. The lyrics themselves take on an abstract meaning and jump from subject to subject as Kohlenstein pulls out connections from seemingly out of nowhere, yet never actually disturbs the flow.

The rest of the lineup contributes to the cohesiveness and ties the whole thing together, with tight drum parts from Jamie Conroy, the driving bass lines from Evan Ballew, and interspersed lead guitars (and occasional glockenspiel) from Dylan Gray and Julia McIntyre. Another Hospital shows they’re willing to switch it up at a moment’s notice, as the build-up in Try It Sometime hits its peak and immediately drops down to a calm before the storm moment, with light drums and a hypnotizing, repetitive vocal eventually hits yet another peak.

This energy drops down and is picked back up by Rotunda in a pattern that occurs through the entire EP. Each song feels separate, but never distinct enough so as to separate itself from the rest. The lines are blurred down to a Groundhog day-esque repetition and within each song there’s a lingering feeling of having heard it before, yet it’s never apparent enough to grow stale.

As Kohlenstein’s vocals hit on This is Normal, the ethereal connections, yet again seemingly meaningless but never out of place, take together to build a new normal. The haunting repetition builds to a mind space of reflection, taking you to new places despite the lyrics never changing, showcasing the band’s ability to build a lot out of very little. As the electric guitar hits, you’re violently pulled out of the vacant mind space for a short while, only to be slowly nudged back in. A voice in the back of your head whispers, “there’s no escape” and you just accept that you’re stuck along for the ride.

Finally, Cycles slowly eases you out of it. The vocals dissolve in front of you as a tight rhythm section keeps you grounded. Your mind whisks about trying to make sense of it all while the song dissolves through a choppy acoustic guitar and synths into a neat little package out of this world. The entire experience is distilled into the very core as slowly the song hits the come down and comes to a stop, with very faint remnants still going on in the background.

Another Hospital Releases the Highly Anticipated EP ‘Proof Of Context’

by Maciej Lewicki

Another Hospital Releases the Highly Anticipated EP ‘Proof Of Context’

Proof of Context, the newest EP from Philadelphia’s Another Hospital feels like an acid trip. From the light acoustic guitar and spacey vocals on the intro to Try It Sometime, front person Eric Kohlenstein sets the stage for the rest of the album – the self-described ‘feeling of being stuck in a loop’ hits from the very start as lines and endings are repeated. The lyrics themselves take on an abstract meaning and jump from subject to subject as Kohlenstein pulls out connections from seemingly out of nowhere, yet never actually disturbs the flow.

The rest of the lineup contributes to the cohesiveness and ties the whole thing together, with tight drum parts from Jamie Conroy, the driving bass lines from Evan Ballew, and interspersed lead guitars (and occasional glockenspiel) from Dylan Gray and Julia McIntyre. Another Hospital shows they’re willing to switch it up at a moment’s notice, as the build-up in Try It Sometime hits its peak and immediately drops down to a calm before the storm moment, with light drums and a hypnotizing, repetitive vocal eventually hits yet another peak.

This energy drops down and is picked back up by Rotunda in a pattern that occurs through the entire EP. Each song feels separate, but never distinct enough so as to separate itself from the rest. The lines are blurred down to a Groundhog day-esque repetition and within each song there’s a lingering feeling of having heard it before, yet it’s never apparent enough to grow stale.

As Kohlenstein’s vocals hit on This is Normal, the ethereal connections, yet again seemingly meaningless but never out of place, take together to build a new normal. The haunting repetition builds to a mind space of reflection, taking you to new places despite the lyrics never changing, showcasing the band’s ability to build a lot out of very little. As the electric guitar hits, you’re violently pulled out of the vacant mind space for a short while, only to be slowly nudged back in. A voice in the back of your head whispers, “there’s no escape” and you just accept that you’re stuck along for the ride.

Finally, Cycles slowly eases you out of it. The vocals dissolve in front of you as a tight rhythm section keeps you grounded. Your mind whisks about trying to make sense of it all while the song dissolves through a choppy acoustic guitar and synths into a neat little package out of this world. The entire experience is distilled into the very core as slowly the song hits the come down and comes to a stop, with very faint remnants still going on in the background.